Ruamāhanga Whaitua

We need your help to make the right decisions. Contribute your ideas in the forum below.

The Ruamāhanga Whaitua committee developed the following vision and outcomes for the waterways of the Wairarapa.

VISION - Wairarapa - Where the water glistens

OUTCOMES - The future is engaged communities proactive in the long term sustainability of the catchment as a whole.

A place where...

  • we are all connected to the water so we are all equally responsible for creating a more natural state;
  • holistic land and water management creates resilience;
  • recreational and cultural opportunities are enhanced;
  • there is a sustainable economic future;
  • water quality is improving;
  • ecological enhancement is sustainable;
  • there is safety and security of (drinking) water supply.
  • Ko wai, Mo wai, No wai: waterways connect communities, there is a sense of identity for people and water;
Waterways connecting communities – The people, Who are you? Who are you for? Who do you belong to?

Build a sense of identity between people and water

Become familiar with all aspects of Whaitua Committee and Wairarapa Community aspirations by browsing the documents here.

Join the conversation about how we might achieve the outcomes while taking account of community values.

We need your help to make the right decisions. Contribute your ideas in the forum below.

The Ruamāhanga Whaitua committee developed the following vision and outcomes for the waterways of the Wairarapa.

VISION - Wairarapa - Where the water glistens

OUTCOMES - The future is engaged communities proactive in the long term sustainability of the catchment as a whole.

A place where...

  • we are all connected to the water so we are all equally responsible for creating a more natural state;
  • holistic land and water management creates resilience;
  • recreational and cultural opportunities are enhanced;
  • there is a sustainable economic future;
  • water quality is improving;
  • ecological enhancement is sustainable;
  • there is safety and security of (drinking) water supply.
  • Ko wai, Mo wai, No wai: waterways connect communities, there is a sense of identity for people and water;
Waterways connecting communities – The people, Who are you? Who are you for? Who do you belong to?

Build a sense of identity between people and water

Become familiar with all aspects of Whaitua Committee and Wairarapa Community aspirations by browsing the documents here.

Join the conversation about how we might achieve the outcomes while taking account of community values.

Survey: How should freshwater contaminants be managed in Ruamāhanga Whaitua?

Image: Wairarapa waterway ©2009 Geoff Walker.

We all want bucket loads of wonderful swimmable, drinkable, fishable, sustainable water for our community, and we need your help to channel the way forward.

The Ruamāhanga Whaitua Committee is an advisory body established by Greater Wellington Regional Council. We’re at the helm of developing an Implementation Programme to support water quality and quantity in the Ruamāhanga catchment. We, like you, want plenty of fresh water for our community, and we want you to help steer us toward the best course of action.

The Ruamāhanga Whaitua Committee operates in partnership with mana whenua and in consultation with local industries, interest groups, and individuals. In order to develop a Whaitua Implementation Programme that reflects the way Ruamāhanga values water and which adheres to the National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management, we’re wanting to understand the opinions, values, needs and concerns of everyone in the community.

This survey is about managing contaminants – dealing with the nitrogen, phosphorus, pathogens and sediments that are all too often polluting our waterways. The survey is broken up into four groups of 2-3 questions, which deal with nitrogen discharge, rural land use, urban contaminants, and land use change.

It’s a complex business, so each group of questions starts with a bit of background to the issue. If you’re interested in wading into more detailed information about water management in the Greater Wellington region, you can click through to some key documents on the right of your screen. The survey is a quick one and should take less than 15 minutes to complete.


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Managing urban contaminants - Background information

Urban discharges, including from wastewater plants, the wastewater network, and stormwater are a cause of pollution in Ruamāhanga waterways. At an individual level, residents can reduce their impact on waterways by washing cars on unpaved surfaces, ensuring animal waste stays away from stormwater drains, and properly disposing of household contaminants such as paints and unwanted chemicals.

Managing urban contaminants - Whaitua Committee Considerations

The Whaitua Committee proposes that urban discharges be managed to meet sub-catchment limits for nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment and pathogens. Contaminant loads from these point sources are much easier to monitor or estimate than those from diffuse discharges like those related to farming. As such, the Committee is considering allocating contaminants among urban dischargers. Other urban contaminants such as copper and zinc would not have specific limits set for them, but would be addressed through the broader urban water management programme.

To what extent do you agree with discharge standards for urban discharges?
To what extent do you agree with discharge standards for urban discharges? Yes, I strongly support this. Yes, I support this. Neither support nor oppose. No, I oppose this. No, I strongly oppose this.
To what extent do you agree with discharge standards for urban discharges?
To what extent do you agree with the implementation of an allocation-based approach to contaminant loads from point sources?
To what extent do you agree with the implementation of an allocation-based approach to contaminant loads from point sources? Yes, I strongly support this. Yes, I support this. Neither support nor oppose. No, I oppose this. No, I strongly oppose this.
To what extent do you agree with the implementation of an allocation-based approach to contaminant loads from point sources?