Wellington Public Transport Spine Study

Consultation has concluded

The consultation period for providing feedback on the Wellington Public Transport Spine Options has now closed.

Over the next few months we will be analysing the submissions and feedback provided through the citizen panels, and reporting this feedback to a Hearings Subcommittee in late November/early December. Those who indicated that they would like to be heard in support of their written submission will have an opportunity to do so at this time.

This will be followed by a decision making process to agree a preferred option to take forward for implementation. 

To view the available technical evaluation reports and appendices go to the main GWRC web page here.

The consultation period for providing feedback on the Wellington Public Transport Spine Options has now closed.

Over the next few months we will be analysing the submissions and feedback provided through the citizen panels, and reporting this feedback to a Hearings Subcommittee in late November/early December. Those who indicated that they would like to be heard in support of their written submission will have an opportunity to do so at this time.

This will be followed by a decision making process to agree a preferred option to take forward for implementation. 

To view the available technical evaluation reports and appendices go to the main GWRC web page here.

Consultation has concluded
  • Results of Greater Say Online Citizen Panel for Wellington's PT Spine Options

    about 5 years ago
    Open uri20140304 7628 m5hkjm?1393924015

    Thanks to all those who responded via the online survey 'Greater Say' to give their views on the Wellington Public Transport Spine options.

    A full report by Horizon's Research analysing the feedback can be viewed here.

    This feedback will be considered alongside feedback received via the Wellington City Council online panels and the submissions to the PT Spine options consultation.

     

    Thanks to all those who responded via the online survey 'Greater Say' to give their views on the Wellington Public Transport Spine options.

    A full report by Horizon's Research analysing the feedback can be viewed here.

    This feedback will be considered alongside feedback received via the Wellington City Council online panels and the submissions to the PT Spine options consultation.

     

  • Short List Option Evaluation findings released

    over 5 years ago
    Open uri20140304 7628 1hyycn5?1393924018

    This final stage of the PT Spine Study involved evaluation of three options: Bus Priority, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and Light Rail Transit (LRT). The evaluation included assessment of potential route alignments, cross sections, modelling the benefits, cost estimates, economic analysis, and social and environmental assessments.

    In summary, the findings from the study are:

    BENEFITS

    • Bus Rapid Transit provides the highest benefits, followed by Light Rail Transit and Bus Priority.

    COSTS

    • The most expensive option is Light Rail Transit at an estimated total cost of $940 million (in 2012 dollars). This is significantly more than the next most expensive option (Bus Rapid Transit) which has an estimated cost of $207 million. The Bus Priority option is least expensive at an estimated cost of $59 million.

    BENEFIT COST RATIO

    • Bus Rapid Transit has the highest overall Benefit Cost Ratio (BCR), followed by Bus Priority then Light Rail Transit.

    STAGING AND TIMING

    • The Bus Priority and Bus Rapid Transit options can be developed incrementally. The optimal staging and timing for the Bus Rapid Transit and Light Rail Transit options, however, is in one stage and completion around 2021-22.

    IMPACTS

    • It is technically feasible to construct all of the options. For most of the route they can be accommodated within the existing road corridor. However, there are potentially significant impacts on property from Bus Rapid Transit and Light Rail Transit options through Mt Victoria and along Ruahine Street and Wellington Road.

    WIDER POLICIES

    • Aligning other policies (such as parking and land use policies) and transport projects would be necessary to realise the full benefits of any of the options. For example, managing any increases in the future availability of commuter parking appears to be key intervention to increase public transport patronage and mode share.

    This final stage of the PT Spine Study involved evaluation of three options: Bus Priority, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and Light Rail Transit (LRT). The evaluation included assessment of potential route alignments, cross sections, modelling the benefits, cost estimates, economic analysis, and social and environmental assessments.

    In summary, the findings from the study are:

    BENEFITS

    • Bus Rapid Transit provides the highest benefits, followed by Light Rail Transit and Bus Priority.

    COSTS

    • The most expensive option is Light Rail Transit at an estimated total cost of $940 million (in 2012 dollars). This is significantly more than the next most expensive option (Bus Rapid Transit) which has an estimated cost of $207 million. The Bus Priority option is least expensive at an estimated cost of $59 million.

    BENEFIT COST RATIO

    • Bus Rapid Transit has the highest overall Benefit Cost Ratio (BCR), followed by Bus Priority then Light Rail Transit.

    STAGING AND TIMING

    • The Bus Priority and Bus Rapid Transit options can be developed incrementally. The optimal staging and timing for the Bus Rapid Transit and Light Rail Transit options, however, is in one stage and completion around 2021-22.

    IMPACTS

    • It is technically feasible to construct all of the options. For most of the route they can be accommodated within the existing road corridor. However, there are potentially significant impacts on property from Bus Rapid Transit and Light Rail Transit options through Mt Victoria and along Ruahine Street and Wellington Road.

    WIDER POLICIES

    • Aligning other policies (such as parking and land use policies) and transport projects would be necessary to realise the full benefits of any of the options. For example, managing any increases in the future availability of commuter parking appears to be key intervention to increase public transport patronage and mode share.