Developing a Māori Economy Strategy for Te Upoko o Te Ika

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Ruruku logo collage with photos from workshops
We need your voice.


A thriving Māori economy is one that generates higher incomes, more jobs and improves opportunity and wellbeing for iwi, hapū and whānau Māori. Greater Wellington Regional Council, in partnership with iwi and local Councils, will work with Māori communities across Te Upoko o Te Ika a Māui on a strategy for the Māori economy.

No matter where you are at in your life, or how connected you are to the Māori economy, this is your plan, your future. So come along to one of the Ruruku Hui.

If you can't make one of the hui, kei te pai! You can post your ideas on the Pou Whakaaro below.

We need your voice.


A thriving Māori economy is one that generates higher incomes, more jobs and improves opportunity and wellbeing for iwi, hapū and whānau Māori. Greater Wellington Regional Council, in partnership with iwi and local Councils, will work with Māori communities across Te Upoko o Te Ika a Māui on a strategy for the Māori economy.

No matter where you are at in your life, or how connected you are to the Māori economy, this is your plan, your future. So come along to one of the Ruruku Hui.

If you can't make one of the hui, kei te pai! You can post your ideas on the Pou Whakaaro below.

Consultation has concluded
  • VUW Business School Dean's Series | Building a Māori economic development strategy for the Wellington region

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    by Charlotte, 04 December, 2019
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    Building a Māori economic development strategy for the Wellington region

    The challenges and opportunities of developing a Māori economic development strategy for the Wellington region were explored at a special Dean’s Series talk hosted by Wellington School of Business and Government in August 2019.

    One of the key priorities for the Business School is supporting Māori and Pasifika economic development. This is also an important area for the Greater Wellington Regional Council (GWRC) who are focussed on building a Māori economic development strategy for the Wellington region.

    The Dean Series talk saw invited panelists—Te Puritanga Jefferies, Senior Māori Economic Development Advisor at Greater Wellington Regional Council; Tui Te Hau, Director – Public Engagement at the National Library of New Zealand; Pera Barrett, founder of the Wellington Shoebox Christmas project; and Kara Puketapu-Dentice, trustee of Taranaki Whānui ki te Upoko o Te Ika and co-founder of Te Tech Tribe—reflect on this topic.

    Throughout the course of the discussion several key ideas were identified as being able to support Māori economic development including broader investment approaches beyond Treaty settlements, mentorship programmes, encouraging an increased tolerance for risk and failure, encouraging investment from a wide variety of groups (not just government), supporting arts and cultural industries, removing entry barriers, and developing infrastructure, models, and conditions that work to support Māori economic development broadly.

    The talk was attended by a number of influential people from the Wellington region, including Adrian Orr, Governor of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

    Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Wellington School of Business and Government Professor Ian Williamson chaired the talk and says it was a privilege to be able to host such an insightful discussion with new emerging Māori leaders from the region.

    “Supporting Māori and Pasifika economic development in the Wellington region and beyond is an important area of focus for the Business School as we increase the number of Māori and Pasifika students, staff, academic research, events, and learning opportunities at the business school,” says Professor Williamson.

    “I want to thank each of the panelists for their valuable insights. I’m looking forward to hosting more Dean’s Series talks like this in the near future.”

    Read the article by VUW here
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